* Drop stitch scarf

Posted on January 22nd, 2006 by maitreya. Filed under Knitting.


I’ve had this variegated ribbony type yarn for a while now, but I haven’t been happy with any of the stitches I’ve tried. So, I finally just gave up and did a drop stitch. So fast, my kind of knitting.

dropscarf.jpg

Here’s the “pattern” if you can glorify it with that term: Using larger needles for your yarn than you would normally use, cast on 21 stitches (or more or less to make different widths, as long as it’s an odd number). Knit 6 rows. Knit one then yarn over twice (or once or 3 times depending on how long you want the drapy bits) over the entire row and ending with a knit. Knit next row, dropping the wraps off the needle as you go (forgot this step in my original post, lol). Knit 5 more rows. Etc. Add fringe as desired.



19 Responses to “Drop stitch scarf”

  1. lyn Says:

    I love it, what a great texture. Beautiful colour too.

  2. abby Says:

    So cute! I really like that butter color right now…so cool.

  3. Adriana Says:

    Wow! It looks amazing!

    Did you come up with the pattern?

  4. kelly Says:

    isn’t that fantastic? i’m such a newbie to knitting, but all of the women in my family got drop stitch, ribbon yarn scarves for Christmas!

  5. Creative Kismet Says:

    It’s fabulous! I’m working on learning to knit. I would love to be able to make this!!

  6. Adriana Says:

    Thank you so much for the pattern! Any hints on what yarn might be good? I really love the colour you chose.

    Sorry I keep pestering you with questions but I really can’t stop looking at your scarf! :-)

  7. oedalis Says:

    Fabulous, I have a multi-colored ribbon yarn, work-in-progress scarf and, like yourself, found that all the stitches I tried with it looked unpleasingly bulky and clumsy and figured the only thing to do was to leave it unstitched for measured stretches but wasn’t sure how many rows of single crochet stitches I could get away with in between. Three looks great. Even accounting for the fact that crochet is bulkier than knitting, I think I’ll try to get away with three rows when I can get my hands on that project again.

  8. Lolly Says:

    Your scarf turned out so beautifully! I think the dropped stitch is such a nice pattern, and so simple. I have made several, and it still impresses me :)

    Just found your blog, and I really like it!

  9. Zarah Says:

    Love the scarf! I have some of the yarn sitting in my stash… I’ll probably steal this idea for the yellow month of Project Spectrum.

  10. Susan Says:

    Can you share what the name of the yarn is that you used for this beauty?

    Thanks!

  11. Maitreya Says:

    Unfortunately I don’t know the name of the yarn; it was an orphan ball in the sale section of the yarn store.

  12. cat Says:

    Shouldn’t you alter your “pattern” to say that you have to, after the yarn-over row, DROP the yarn overs?

  13. Christine Says:

    I was wondering if you came up with a more specific “pattern” for this. I LOVE it! When I try it, though, my rows don’t look uniform – the stitches on each end are lower than the ones in the middle. Is there a “trick” to doing this? It’s a GREAT scarf!

  14. maitreya Says:

    Yeah, the edge stitches are definitely a bit of a problem. I think I just kind of pulled them into some semblance of shape, tugging extra hard at the beginning and end of rows. How bad it looks probably depends somewhat on the yarn.

    Oh, and yes, thanks cat for pointing out where the drop comes in. Haha.

  15. G.Blaylock Says:

    It would be great if you couldn publish the instructions for the drop stich or the website where to find them.
    It looks real pretty.

  16. maitreya Says:

    Drop stitch just means sliding the yarn over wraps off the needle instead of knitting them. Good luck!

  17. moe Says:

    looks exquisite. am knitting one right now.

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